Casey Nocket (aka Creepytings), who may be the most high-profile outdoor vandal in memory, pleaded guilty this week to seven misdemeanor charges of injury and depredation to government property.

According to the plea agreement, Nocket agreed that the government recommended she be sentenced to an initial term of 10 days imprisonment and 100 hours of community service, and that she was responsible for financial restitution which may be in excess of $1000. The plea bargain also stipulates that no portion of financial obligations can be discharged or nullified via bankruptcy.

As of June 13th, Nocket has so far been sentenced to:

  • 24 months probation
  • A ban from entering all lands administered by the National Park Service, National Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the purpose of recreation during that 24 month probation
  • Prepare a formal written apology to the National Park Service
  • 200 hours of community service in the National Park Service or other public lands, with a strong preference for graffiti removal

The maximum sentence for depredation of government property is one year and $100,000 per count, along with one year of probation and a $25 fee per count, meaning Nocket could face 7 years incarceration, 7 years of probation, and $700,000.

The restitution hearing is currently scheduled for December 2, 2016, although the parties may agree on an amount before that court date.

The plea bargain was signed and dated on June 10th, 2016 and was accompanied by an attached statement from Nocket dated June 8th, 2016, wherein she acknowledges that from September 12 through October 7, 2014, she visited and vandalized Death Valley National Park, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado National Monument, Canyonlands National Park, Zion National Park, Yosemite National Park, and Crater Lake National Park. This statement estimates the financial cost of the damage for some of the incidents, which was less than $1000 at Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado National Monument, Canyonlands National Park, Zion National Park, and Yosemite National Park.

Exhibit 10 Crater Lake Before

Nocket’s vandalism at Crater Lake National Park

At this time, Nocket’s vandalism in Crater Lake and Death Valley have not yet been restored. Her work has been removed from Rocky Mountain, Canyonlands, and Yosemite National Parks. The legal documents do not state whether or not her vandalism remains in Colorado National Monument and Zion National Park. Crews are expected to complete cleanups in Death Valley in the near future, and at Crater Lake as weather permits.

The case has been under investigation since Modern Hiker first broke the news of Nocket’s vandalism on October 21st, 2014.

We would like to thank all of the investigators, attorneys, and rangers who have been working on this case since that date. We know they have been under intense public pressure from people who were frustrated at the lack of available information during that time, and at Modern Hiker we have also felt that frustration at times. But we also knew that this case was complex and complicated, and that making its way through the justice system was going to take time.

While Nocket may be eligible for a $700,000 fine, we expect the actual amount to be much smaller — and that is entirely reasonable. Most of the vandalized parks reported the cleanup costs at under $1000. Nocket is 23 years old and while passions are rightly running high in the outdoor community, saddling someone so young with $700,000 of non-dischargable debt would be an exceedingly punitive sentence that no court should even consider.

Instead, we are happy that the Park Service is getting a formal apology and we hope they use this media attention and high-profile case as an opportunity to educate the public to help prevent these sorts of actions in the future.

It is likely that a contrite Nocket will actually end up doing much more good for the Park Service than the damages she has already inflicted on them … and we can think of no better closure for this case.

[pdf-embedder url=”https://modernhiker.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Nocket-plea-agreement.pdf”]

[pdf-embedder url=”https://modernhiker.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Nocket-sentencing-memorandum.pdf”]

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Modern Hiker, Author of "Day Hiking Los Angeles," Walking Meditator, Native Plant Enthusiast.

35 Comments

Jim

Jim Sep 3, 2017 18:09

It's been over a year and I can't find a closing to this story

Any updates on the fines or anything of that nature ?

Thanks !!!

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David Hodge Jul 7, 2016 14:07In reply to: Bob Loblaw

If you were holding a mic when you wrote this, I sure hope you dropped it.

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Joanna Jun 30, 2016 09:06In reply to: Casey Schreiner

Casey, I appreciate your insight on this situation. As a nature enthusiast my immediate reaction is outrage and wanting to see serious consequences for this girl but your comments bring me back to reality. She is still an immature 23 year old girl with her entire life ahead of her. To place charges on her that could potentially ruin her life is another injustice.

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artsilvaphoto Jun 27, 2016 18:06In reply to: Dan Jones

Dan, texting smartphones and postal carriers didn't exist back then for necessary communication and documentation and usually didn't have tourist and backpackers running through their village. Even then their "art" were confined to protected areas such as caves or dwellings... Perspective man, think about it.

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Carol Duprey (@Babaloofa) Jun 26, 2016 16:06In reply to: Dan Jones

@Dan Jones...Are you actually that stupid? Cavemen had no other way to communicate their culture. They did not have the spoken word let alone formal writing. Modern man does. We are thankful the cavemen left something we can study to try to understand the distant past. You really are quite the moron.

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Ben Dover Jun 23, 2016 18:06

Too bad she didn't fall from a climb & crack her fuggin head open.

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Henrick Jun 23, 2016 18:06In reply to: Fredric L. Rice

As part of the plea deal they should have her admit to ALL the places she defaced beyond the 7 she has admitted to. Those would not be counted against her. However, any further discovery of graffitti from her above and beyond what she admits to would be eligible for further prosecution.
Let's see how many places she has defaced.

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Susan Jun 23, 2016 17:06

She deserves much more, and she should be saddled with a large amount so she feels the pain the people who love the National Parks and live in those areas felt every time they ran across her trashy scribbling. She was called on her actions on Twitter and was totally dismissive of her actions. She will never change because she thinks she's an 'artist' and should be able to do what she did. The only way she will learn is jail time and a large fine. Who cares how much it cost to clean up. This 'banksy wanna-be' should never be allowed in a National Park again.

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Casey Schreiner Jun 23, 2016 10:06In reply to: Accipiter

200 hours of trail work - especially for someone who is not used to doing trail work - is going to be more than enough to deter her from further park vandalizations. The combination of that with the public apology (and what I hope is excellent NPS coverage of these things on their social media pages) will hopefully send a strong message to those who may be thinking of following in her footsteps.

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Accipiter Jun 23, 2016 10:06In reply to: NoBody

Agreed. Whenever someone breaks the law, people seem to ooze out of the woodwork screaming for lengthy prison sentences. Why? The woman vandalized land, she didn't commit violence against people, so incarceration isn't necessary since she's not a dangerous person. That's what prison is supposed to be for - separating dangerous people from the rest of society. I think community service, probation, a lifetime parks ban and a hefty fine is suitable punishment for a non-violent offense.

What she did was awful, but for godsakes people, be realistic and just. She doesn't need to be incarcerated.

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Accipiter Jun 23, 2016 10:06In reply to: Casey Schreiner

200 hours of volunteer work is not a lot. I've been volunteering for 6 years doing raptor rehab, probably 75% of which is scrubbing and raking bird aviaries and 200 hours is nothing. Plenty of people do volunteer work, so 200 hours might be significant enough to make her think twice about vandalizing again, but isn't a terrible punishment.

Hopefully she's fined for the cost of all the previous cleanup and the National Park ban is kept in place for her.

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Casey Schreiner Jun 23, 2016 09:06In reply to: Dan Jones

You may wish to read some of the other several hundreds of words we have written on this subject. Your point has already been well-addressed.

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Casey Schreiner Jun 23, 2016 09:06In reply to: Rachel

If 200 hours of service removing graffiti and doing trail work is "not that bad," then we look forward to seeing you out on the trail helping us!

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Callum Rocks Jun 23, 2016 08:06In reply to: Dan Jones

One (who had no other medium to draw on) is ancient storytelling that tells the tale of the time, the other (who had plenty of other mediums at her disposal e.g. canvas, paper) is just a wannabe artist with poor artistic skill trying to be unique. Also take into account that these are protected lands with laws and regulations that serve a purpose of protecting the land, she broke those regulations. If you let one person get away with it you open national parks as a colouring book for anyone with a pen.

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Bob Loblaw Jun 23, 2016 08:06In reply to: Dan Jones

When cavemen killed people it was called survival, but if modern man does it, it's murder.

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Joseph Dan Jun 23, 2016 07:06In reply to: Dan Jones

Look at it this way-- exponentially larger populations nowadays means we have to behave in public spaces, lest they all get defaced. Modern civilization has benefits and drawbacks, one of the drawbacks being that we all more-or-less agree to controlling our urges and keeping public spaces clean.

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Dan Jones Jun 23, 2016 06:06

So when cavemen did it, it's parietal art, but if modern man does it, it's vandalism.

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Rachel Jun 23, 2016 06:06

Are you kidding me? There has been a major rise in people vandalizing areas and entering areas they are not supposed to be and doing damage globally. Why? Because they think even if they get caught it won't be that bad. And here's a case proving their point. The reason they need to go hard on her is to show others they can't just do this and get slapped with probation and a small fine. It's harsh to give a young girl that much debt? She broke the law knowing full well what the punishment would be and I guarantee you she did it because she figured it wouldn't be enforced so I guess she was right. People are "out for blood" because she is not the first person to do shit like this this year alone there have been so many cases. We're sick of it and want to see these people get justly punished.

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NoBody Jun 23, 2016 03:06

The plea is more than reasonable. Some of you just want blood for some reason. It would cost way more to jail her than the damage she had caused and the cost to clean it. If you really want to punish her a lifetime ban to the parks and social media would be good.

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Tim Thomas Jun 22, 2016 12:06In reply to: Jennifer Shaw

How justice was handled here is ... entirely routine. Nothing out of the ordinary at all despite your breathless and wordy attempt to make it so. Everything is exactly as expected for a relatively low-level offense. And I don't need any more of my tax dollars spent than necessary extracting punishment.

It's not a harsh deal, and it's not a sweet deal. It's fair. This woman will be (briefly) incarcerated, fined, and on probation for years with all associated costs. Her record is permanently stained and should she break the law in the future, she will see much harsher penalties as it is no longer her first offense. Save the prison time for those committing violence against others or serious crimes. We are fortunate that she was brought to justice and one hopes her attitude has been severely changed. One experience with the court system in this country is usually enough to keep you out of it in the future. And if not ... you'll enjoy it even less on subsequent visits.

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Mic Jun 20, 2016 19:06In reply to: Bob Pissedoff

Totally agree..wt#, Modern Hiker?? Idc what her age is nor that the fines are non-dischargable. She needs to learn a lesson. She should be in jail. How about the tax payer money wasted investigating this sh#t?? We live in a society where people think they should be able to run havoc with no repercussions. Just look at her current Facebook profile photo. She doesn't care what anyone thinks of her. Well guess what; some of us are sick of the lack of respect. Fine her the $700,000 and post it outside every National Park as a Warning to other possible perpetrators.

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Jimbo Jun 20, 2016 17:06

In my opinion the reason that she got off so light was because she's a woman. If a guy her age had vandalized that many parks he'd definitely would have been charged with a felony and received jail time with no plea bargain option.

On the other hand, no one on Wall Street faced criminal prosecution for their role in bringing the world economy to it's knees. So, you have to wonder about the fairness of prison time for anyone but violent criminals.

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Missy Lieberman Jun 17, 2016 20:06In reply to: Raphael D Mazor

Now that's an interesting punishment idea.

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Raphael D Mazor Jun 17, 2016 11:06

It would be great if some of the social media companies (e.g., instagram) banned her. Essentially, she used instagram to commit her crime.

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amkaplan Jun 15, 2016 16:06

I hope the courts get serious about this and nail her on some restitution.

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Bob Pissedoff Jun 15, 2016 13:06In reply to: Jennifer Shaw

Totally agreed with you! Pure BS!

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Bob Pissedoff Jun 15, 2016 13:06

Pure BS! Are you kidding me Modern Hike... Your on with this ruling! Go take a hike!

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Jennifer Shaw Jun 15, 2016 13:06In reply to: Desertphile

That ain't the half of it.

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Jennifer Shaw Jun 15, 2016 13:06

Casey Nocket got an incredibly sweet plea deal. The lawyer who engineered it is laughing his/her heard off. The deal was so orchestrated-to-be-not-punitive and showed so much "juice" no lawyer for Nocket wanted to put their name on it when Nocket signed it.

The plea deal was signed by Nocket and the "Acting" U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of California on 6/8/16.

Nocket didn't get a free public defender until 2 days later, who appeared for Nocket in court only on 6/13/16...so embarrassing was the plea deal the Federal Public Defender assigned the case to a woman who had been a lawyer less than a year. The court file has no order appointing the Federal Public Defender, and the young woman quit the same day the case was filed and Nocket was "sentenced", 6/13/16.

Federal prosecutors are usually the meanest prosecutors in town. So one has to ask who does Casey Nocket or her family know, and how much money did they pay to get this sweet deal?

If I worked for the National Park Service of the B.L.M. I would be hopping mad about its terms, given the number of Federal properties defaced and the size of Nocket's grafitti. It's not even compentent art!

The phony-baloney-resolution of the widespread, arrogant, tasteless defacing of National Parks and National Monuments was filed in the Federal court in Fresno, heard by an assistant judge, and Nocket was sentenced all in one day.

It was a slam dunk, intentionally designed so that the press and public could not see who in the government made the deal, other than the hapless Acting U.S. Attorney named Phillip A. Talbert. (Talbert only took office on May 1, 2016 and he is hoping to be permanently appointed to that job. https://www.justice.gov/usao-edca/district-reports It looks like this stinky plea deal was jammed down this throat...but by whom?)

The Nocket case was re-assigned the next-day, 6/14/16, to the lowest ranking assistant judge in the court, who promptly closed the case.

Nocket got "unsupervised probation" so there will be no one to even watch if she's doing what the assistant judge wanted (scrubbing grime and graffiti in National Parks) or teaching free art classes in some cushy community center.

My compliments to the lawyers who got this sweet deal done for Casey Nocket, whoever they are and where ever they work, for the Federal government or a private law firm. I'd love to know if it was Nocket's looks or a pile of money which got Nocket the sweet plea deal.

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Bradley Leyten Jun 15, 2016 12:06

It always sickens me when I find myself in a beautiful natural setting that someone has tainted with spray point or vandalized in some other way. I wish there was a more severe punishement for fools like this!!

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Chuck Stock Jun 14, 2016 23:06

Have her clean it up, pay for the cost and be done with it. She didn't kill someone for Pete's sake.

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ljay Jun 14, 2016 23:06

thanks rebecca, for doing the right thing by publicly calling the tagger out. good to know there are still good souls out there. thanks, modern hiker, for the writeup exposing this tagger.

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Desertphile Jun 14, 2016 16:06

I am dismayed there was a plea bargain.

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Terry Jun 14, 2016 16:06

Nice work, Casey. I appreciate your shedding a light on this.

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Fredric L. Rice Jun 14, 2016 12:06

She admitted to 7 counts yet the number of places she vandalized is far, far more in number.

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