Casey Nocket (aka Creepytings), who may be the most high-profile outdoor vandal in memory, pleaded guilty this week to seven misdemeanor charges of injury and depredation to government property.

According to the plea agreement, Nocket agreed that the government recommended she be sentenced to an initial term of 10 days imprisonment and 100 hours of community service, and that she was responsible for financial restitution which may be in excess of $1000. The plea bargain also stipulates that no portion of financial obligations can be discharged or nullified via bankruptcy.

As of June 13th, Nocket has so far been sentenced to:

  • 24 months probation
  • A ban from entering all lands administered by the National Park Service, National Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the purpose of recreation during that 24 month probation
  • Prepare a formal written apology to the National Park Service
  • 200 hours of community service in the National Park Service or other public lands, with a strong preference for graffiti removal

The maximum sentence for depredation of government property is one year and $100,000 per count, along with one year of probation and a $25 fee per count, meaning Nocket could face 7 years incarceration, 7 years of probation, and $700,000.

The restitution hearing is currently scheduled for December 2, 2016, although the parties may agree on an amount before that court date.

The plea bargain was signed and dated on June 10th, 2016 and was accompanied by an attached statement from Nocket dated June 8th, 2016, wherein she acknowledges that from September 12 through October 7, 2014, she visited and vandalized Death Valley National Park, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado National Monument, Canyonlands National Park, Zion National Park, Yosemite National Park, and Crater Lake National Park. This statement estimates the financial cost of the damage for some of the incidents, which was less than $1000 at Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado National Monument, Canyonlands National Park, Zion National Park, and Yosemite National Park.

Exhibit 10 Crater Lake Before

Nocket’s vandalism at Crater Lake National Park

At this time, Nocket’s vandalism in Crater Lake and Death Valley have not yet been restored. Her work has been removed from Rocky Mountain, Canyonlands, and Yosemite National Parks. The legal documents do not state whether or not her vandalism remains in Colorado National Monument and Zion National Park. Crews are expected to complete cleanups in Death Valley in the near future, and at Crater Lake as weather permits.

The case has been under investigation since Modern Hiker first broke the news of Nocket’s vandalism on October 21st, 2014.

We would like to thank all of the investigators, attorneys, and rangers who have been working on this case since that date. We know they have been under intense public pressure from people who were frustrated at the lack of available information during that time, and at Modern Hiker we have also felt that frustration at times. But we also knew that this case was complex and complicated, and that making its way through the justice system was going to take time.

While Nocket may be eligible for a $700,000 fine, we expect the actual amount to be much smaller — and that is entirely reasonable. Most of the vandalized parks reported the cleanup costs at under $1000. Nocket is 23 years old and while passions are rightly running high in the outdoor community, saddling someone so young with $700,000 of non-dischargable debt would be an exceedingly punitive sentence that no court should even consider.

Instead, we are happy that the Park Service is getting a formal apology and we hope they use this media attention and high-profile case as an opportunity to educate the public to help prevent these sorts of actions in the future.

It is likely that a contrite Nocket will actually end up doing much more good for the Park Service than the damages she has already inflicted on them … and we can think of no better closure for this case.

[pdf-embedder url=”https://modernhiker.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Nocket-plea-agreement.pdf”]

 

[pdf-embedder url=”https://modernhiker.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Nocket-sentencing-memorandum.pdf”]

 

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Modern Hiker, Author of "Day Hiking Los Angeles," Walking Meditator, Native Plant Enthusiast.





36 Comments

derp Jan 10, 2019 07:01In reply to: Jim

This article is literally closure, unless you want pics of her actually doing community service?

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Jim Sep 3, 2017 18:09

It's been over a year and I can't find a closing to this story

Any updates on the fines or anything of that nature ?

Thanks !!!

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David Hodge Jul 7, 2016 14:07In reply to:

If you were holding a mic when you wrote this, I sure hope you dropped it.

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Joanna Jun 30, 2016 09:06In reply to: Casey Schreiner

Casey, I appreciate your insight on this situation. As a nature enthusiast my immediate reaction is outrage and wanting to see serious consequences for this girl but your comments bring me back to reality. She is still an immature 23 year old girl with her entire life ahead of her. To place charges on her that could potentially ruin her life is another injustice.

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artsilvaphoto Jun 27, 2016 18:06In reply to:

Dan, texting smartphones and postal carriers didn't exist back then for necessary communication and documentation and usually didn't have tourist and backpackers running through their village. Even then their "art" were confined to protected areas such as caves or dwellings... Perspective man, think about it.

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Carol Duprey (@Babaloofa) Jun 26, 2016 16:06In reply to:

@Dan Jones...Are you actually that stupid? Cavemen had no other way to communicate their culture. They did not have the spoken word let alone formal writing. Modern man does. We are thankful the cavemen left something we can study to try to understand the distant past. You really are quite the moron.

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Ben Dover Jun 23, 2016 18:06

Too bad she didn't fall from a climb & crack her fuggin head open.

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Henrick Jun 23, 2016 18:06In reply to:

As part of the plea deal they should have her admit to ALL the places she defaced beyond the 7 she has admitted to. Those would not be counted against her. However, any further discovery of graffitti from her above and beyond what she admits to would be eligible for further prosecution.
Let's see how many places she has defaced.

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Susan Jun 23, 2016 17:06

She deserves much more, and she should be saddled with a large amount so she feels the pain the people who love the National Parks and live in those areas felt every time they ran across her trashy scribbling. She was called on her actions on Twitter and was totally dismissive of her actions. She will never change because she thinks she's an 'artist' and should be able to do what she did. The only way she will learn is jail time and a large fine. Who cares how much it cost to clean up. This 'banksy wanna-be' should never be allowed in a National Park again.

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Casey Schreiner Jun 23, 2016 10:06In reply to:

200 hours of trail work - especially for someone who is not used to doing trail work - is going to be more than enough to deter her from further park vandalizations. The combination of that with the public apology (and what I hope is excellent NPS coverage of these things on their social media pages) will hopefully send a strong message to those who may be thinking of following in her footsteps.

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