Distance (round-trip)

1 mi

Time

1 hrs

Elevation Gain

140 ft

Season

Spring
Summer
Fall

Weather

A mile-long hike near the park’s eastern entrance, the Canyon Overlook Trail is a wonderful introduction to Zion Canyon (or a nice look back on your way out, too). This short but fun trail will take you over slickrock, above slot canyons, and into some small alcoves before giving you a phenomenal view of the canyon floor from the east.

Just to the east of the park’s eastern entrance, on the way to Mount Carmel Junction, there’s a short but sweet trail right next to the historic Zion – Mt. Carmel Tunnel called the Canyon Overlook Trail. If you’re on your way into the park, it will give you a good introduction to the geography and geology of the region – and if you’re on your way out it’s a nice way to gaze one last time at one of the most beautiful places in the country.

The trail starts right before the eastern entrance to the tunnel. Look for a trailhead sign and a set of stairs cut into the rock.

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After a steep climb, the trail remains relatively level. Almost immediately, the canyon opens up into some dramatic, otherworldly landscapes … even though you can’t actually see Zion Canyon until the end of the trail.

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For such a short and relatively easy route, the Canyon Overlook Trail passes a stunning variety of landscapes. You’ll meander past deep slot canyons, cling to slickrock walls, and duck under some gnarled pinon pines – all while soaking in the amazing red rock landscape around you. There is one very short section where you’ll have to cross a small wooden plank bridge into an alcove. If you’re extremely nervous about heights, you might have to take a few deep breaths but it’s nothing to be afraid of.

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After a short distance, the trail comes upon a small slickrock slope. Climb this final obstacle and your reward is a phenomenal view of the canyon floor below you (and the switchbacks of the Zion – Mt. Carmel Highway, too!).

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Return back the way you came – making sure you take time to notice any hidden gems the desert might be showing off along the way.

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Note: The Zion – Mt. Carmel Tunnel was built in the 1920s and cannot accommodate some oversized vehicles. If you have a large vehicle, you will have to pay an additional fee to have the tunnel closed to two-way traffic for you. During the winter months, you’ll have to make this request before your arrival. Visit the Park’s Tunnel Site for more info.

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Modern Hiker, Author of "Day Hiking Los Angeles" and "Discovering Griffith Park." Walking Meditator, Native Plant Enthusiast.





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Trail Map

1 Comment

Julia Jun 2, 2013 06:06

Nice pictures. This is a great way to introduce hikers to some rich geography and terrain. Seems like a fantastic trail to start breaking in some new hiking boots

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Should You Hike Here?

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If infection rates are on the rise, please do your best to remain local for your hikes. If you do travel, please be mindful of small gateway communities and avoid as much interaction as you can. Also remember to be extra prepared with supplies so you don't have to stop somewhere outside your local community for gas, food, or anything else.

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