A pilot shuttle program is on its way to Chantry Flat, the extremely popular hiking destination that allows hikers easy access to Hermit Falls and Sturtevant Falls, along with longer treks to Mount Wilson and the historic Camp Sturtevant.

Following suit with the popular shuttle to Fish Canyon, the Angeles National Forest will be testing a temporary pilot shuttle on several upcoming weekends, which will run from the Arcadia Gold Line Station to the Chanty Flat picnic area. The Gold Line station is within walking distance of the Forest Service Headquarters, the Arcadia REI, and an In-N-Out. Chantry Flat is home to Adams’ Pack Station, which not only makes some killer burgers and BBQ, but will also be holding some free live music on several of these shuttle days!

chantry flat parking lot-1

the Chantry Flat parking lot. Take Metro and avoid this!

The shuttles will run free of charge, courtesy of funds from Car-less California and – despite Chantry Flat not being a part of the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument – this pilot program is a direct result of the new Monument Management Plan (which is currently in its public comment period).

No word yet on the frequency of the shuttles, but the first shuttle will depart from Arcadia at 7AM and the last return trip from Chantry Flat will be at 4PM.

The shuttles will run the following days:

  • Saturday, September 24 (National Public Lands Day)
  • Sunday, September 25
  • Saturday, October 1
  • Sunday, October 2
  • Saturday, October 8
  • Sunday, October 9

On those days, the Forest Service is looking for volunteers to help staff informational kiosks at Arcadia and Chantry Flat in four-hour shifts. If you are interested, please sign up here. There is a briefing session in person or via phone on Friday, September 16.

The new push for transportation options is one of the things we’re most excited about in the new San Gabriel Mountains National Monument management plan, and we are extremely happy to see that the popular Chantry Flat area may be benefiting from the new designation even though its outside of the Monument’s boundaries. We first wondered why there wasn’t a shuttle to Chantry Flat back in 2010, and we think Santa Anita Canyon’s popularity and extremely limited parking make this a perfect place to test out the next transit shuttle in the San Gabriel Mountains.

We’ll update this post with any additional information as we get it.

Sept. 8: The September 17th date is considered a “soft launch” / test run for the shuttle. While the shuttle will be operational, the main purpose of that day is to work out the kinks and see how things run for what we assume will be the “official” launch the following weekend on National Public Lands Day. The Forest Service still needs volunteers on that day (and all days!), but if you show up on the 17th specifically to use the shuttle, please be patient. There is still no word on a schedule or operating hours for the shuttle, but emails suggest that will be finalized in the lead-up to National Public Lands Day.

 

Gold Line train image public domain, taken by Wikimedia user “The Port of Authority

 

Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Modern Hiker, Author of "Day Hiking Los Angeles," Walking Meditator, Native Plant Enthusiast.





22 Comments

Casey Schreiner Apr 16, 2018 18:04In reply to: Sarah N Sadik

It's primarily a funding issue, but it's also jurisdictional - this is funded through grants and run by one organization - the Pasadena transit. Once a transit company leaves a city boundary it becomes a lot more complicated to pull off (though not impossible!).

In the management plan draft for the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument, there is a heavy focus on reducing the amount of private automobile trips by providing additional forms of transportation, so what you're saying is definitely on peoples' minds -- but it's on US to contact our elected representatives (local, state, and federal) to let them know that these sorts of programs are a priority for us.

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Sarah N Sadik Apr 16, 2018 18:04

As much as I love this- I am kind of disappointed. Why won't it run during the summer? Why won't there be a shuttle that gives us access to other trail heads? A lot of trail heads start on rt. 2 so wouldn't it be better to have both options?

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Casey Schreiner Mar 16, 2018 18:03In reply to: Peter Kosenko

The shuttle was only a pilot program - set to run for a few weeks.

Groups are currently looking for funding to revive the shuttle permanently.

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Peter Kosenko Mar 16, 2018 14:03

So what happened to the shuttle? It appeared for a couple weekends, then we never heard about it again. I used it one of those weekends, and it was pretty full.

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Casey Schreiner Sep 15, 2016 16:09In reply to: Anthony

Thank you - and I hope these are all questions you're presenting to the Forest Service yourself during the public meetings! If you read our recap of the first online public meeting, you'll see I asked a similar question about the interpretive resources geared toward combating increased litter and graffiti. They honestly want to hear concerns like this, and your input will help them create better plans for the mountains we all love!

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Anthony Sep 15, 2016 13:09In reply to: Casey Schreiner

Thanks for clarifying. I was under the impression that the shuttle was being funded by public money. How is CarLess funded?

Money aside, I still believe it's a bad idea to transport people into the park without having a plan to deal with a likely increase of trash, graffiti, and erosion. Does the FS have one? The shuttle is appealing from a social standpoint, but it would be a mistake to judge it by its intention, rather than by its results (we'll have to wait and see what happens). Is decreasing the amount of cars on the road better than increasing the number of people on the trails? I'm no fan of traffic in the forest, but I'd rather have congestion near the trailhead than congestion on the trails.

Thanks for the update, though. Your site is a great resource.

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Casey Schreiner Sep 15, 2016 10:09In reply to:

This money is coming from a grant from Car-less California and is specifically designed to achieve goals laid out in the Transportation Plan and the goals called for in both the proclamation / establishment of the new National Monument and the Social and Environmental Justice goals in the new Management Plan. There are many issues facing this Forest, yes, but this money is ONLY usable for projects that help remove cars from the existing roads. If the Forest Service didn't use it for something like this, they wouldn't get the money at all.

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Anthony Sep 15, 2016 10:09In reply to:

I don't advocate restricting the flow of people into the park, but shuttling people seems like an extreme solution in the opposite direction.

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Anthony Sep 15, 2016 10:09In reply to:

I agree that parking is a serious problem there. But as others have pointed out, that might be a blessing in disguise as it regulates the amount of people in the area. Shuttling crowds of people into the area will make it a less desirable destination for those who like to get away from the city. I stopped going to Eaton Canyon because of the crowds, which is a shame because the area is beautiful. It was like being at Disneyland in the forest though. Hundreds upon hundreds of people.

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Anthony Sep 15, 2016 10:09In reply to:

I don't have a political/economic agenda, I just think there are more important things the money could be spent on. Reckless driving is a serious problem in the forest these days. Race cars and motorcycles seem to be taking over the roads too. I'm not a big fan of law enforcement, but I would love to see more patrols on the roads to enforce traffic laws. I would also like to see more rehabilitation and trail repairs in burn areas, especially the Station Fire area. I hold the ANF close to my heart, which is why I believe the Forest Service should spend more on protecting and maintaining it.

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